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Clamming in Puget Sound – 在普吉特海湾挖蛤蜊

So, I am well into my Summer vacation and I am having a great time. I am working a few jobs – 5 if you want to be specific, but with varying hours and responsibilities. The vast majority of the time I am working at Goldberg Jones which is a Seattle Family Law Firm.
The weekends have brought some entertainment. Last weekend, we went down to Kopachuck State Park near Gig Harbor.  It was a beach-side park, and we dug for clams and oysters. It was quite an adventure. Neither of us had ever dug for clams, but after a little trial and error, we were able to find some big ones.
The weekends have brought some entertainment. Last weekend, we went down to Kopachuck State Park near Gig Harbor.  It was a beach-side park, and we dug for clams and oysters. It was quite an adventure. Neither of us had ever dug for clams, but after a little trial and error, we were able to find some big ones.
Being the fastidious googler that I am, I spent the afternoon before our trip researching Clamming, Clamming Locations, and How to Clam in Seattle. Most of what I came up with were posts about digging for Razor clams, which unfortunately, the season has already closed. However, I was able to pick up some good youtube clips on how to clam, and armed with my internet knowledge, a clam “gun,” and some print outs we wandered down to the state park.
The clam gun is  a cool tool. It is a small tube with handles, and a air hole to control suction. You press the gun into the sand and come up with a column of dirt, and hopefully a few clams. However, for the first few tries we were only able to come up with worms. Then we moved over to the rock area where people were digging. Unfortunately, the gun is not well designed for rocky shores, and we spent most of the time digging with our hands and big shells we found on the beach.
Our first big butter clam.
After exhausting ourselves on the rocky shore, we wandered down the beach to a muddy area with a lot of clam holes. This is where we struck pay dirt. We picked up a ton of manila clams from that area.
The oysters were another interesting experience. At low tide, the oyster bed was exposed and we are able to walk about and pick up the oysters. According to the regulations, we had to shuck the oysters on the beach, and leave the shells behind so that the baby oysters had a place to grab on and grow. So, we wandered along the beach, gathered a bunch up, and then fought against their tough shells trying to pry them open, but not stab ourselves with the knife (a fate that left our neighbor oyster shucker with a bloody hand).We also picked up a couple of muscles attached to the oysters out in the water.
For our effort, we were tired, muddy, cold, but we brought home a cooler full shellfish.
We steamed a few the first evening, but they still had not worked out all their sand, so, we waited until the next evening and had a clam frying party with a couple of our good Chinese friends.
All-in-all it was some good times.
See essential clamming supplies below!

  • http://giotrumbo.blogspot.com Giovanni

    I do read your blog! I like it very much. It’s very artistic and you’re a good writer. :]